Coral8: Event Stream Processing and Intrusion Detection

January 3, 2008

Not quite ready for prime-time, we have been testing our home-grown UNIX domain socket adapter using Coral8 Java APIs.   We are using this adapter to evaluate and demonstrate stream processing with intrusion detection systems (IDS) using event stream processing to reduce false alarms, detect derived situations from the raw intrusion event data, and feed a security management visualization dashboard.

You can click on the teaser image below to see more of our first IDS screenshots from Coral8’s Studio stream visualization tool.

Coral8 IDS Example

If you click on the image above, you will four additional event stream properties.  For this part of the demo, there are 14 total IDS properties in the event stream, but we only show 5 properties in this cropped screen capture.

I am quite sure that we could do similar integration with other event stream processing engines, but fortunately Coral8 makes it easy to download, start developing and testing. 


OpenCourseWare: Get Smart for Complex Event Processing!

December 30, 2007

Ready to move beyond the basics of event processing?   Perhaps you would like to beef up your Java skills?   The Basics of Signal Processing?  Or maybe you are interested in Advanced Complexity Theory?   Artificial IntelligenceComputer Language EngineeringQueueing Theory?

Well then, put your feet up, relax and click on over to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT OpenCourseWare  (OCW) and enjoy their courses, freely available to anyone, anywhere. 

MIT’s OCW program freely shares their lecture notes, exams, and other resources from more than 1800 courses spanning MIT’s entire curriculum, including many fields related to event processing.     There are even RSS feeds on new courses as they hit the wire, so you don’t have to miss a thing!  Also, check out the OSC Consortium.

Complex event processing is a multi-discipline approach for detecting both opportunities and threats in real-time cyberspace.   Make it your New Years Resolution to review a few OCW lectures and help advance the state-of-the-art of CEP!


COTS Software Versus (Hard) Coding in EP Applications

November 21, 2007

Opher Etzion has kindly asked me to write a paragraph or two on commercial-off-the-shelf  (COTS) software versus (hard) coding software in event processing applications. 

My thoughts on this topic are similar to my earlier blog musings, Latency Takes a Back Seat to Accuracy in CEP Applications.

If you buy a EP engine (today) because it permits you run some quick-and-dirty (rule-based) analytics against a stream of incoming events, and you can do this quickly without spending considerable software development costs, and the learning curve and implementation curve for the COTS is relatively low, this could be a good business decision, obviously.   Having a software license for an EP engine that permits you to quickly develop and change analytics, variables and parameters on-the-fly is useful. 

On the other hand, the current state of many CEP platforms, and their declarative programming modelling capabilities, is that they focus on If-Then-Else, Event-Condition-Action (ECA), rule-based analytics.  Sophisticated processing requires more functionality that just ECA rules, because most advanced detection-oriented applications are not just ECA solutions.

For many classes of EP applications today, writing code may still be the best way to achieve the results (accuracy, confidence) you are looking for, because CEP software platforms have not yet evolved to plug-and-play analytical platforms, providing a wide range of sophisticated analytics in combination with quality modelling tools for the all business users and their advanced detection requirements.

For this reason, and others which I don’t have time to write about today, I don’t think that we can say blanket statements that “CEP is about using engines versus writing programs or hard coding procedures.”   Event processing, in context to specific business problems, is the “what” and using a CEP/EP modelling tool and execution engine is only one of the possible “hows” in an event processing architecture.  

As we know, CEP/EP engines, and the marketplace for using them, are still evolving and maturing; hence, there are many CEP/EP applications, today, and in the foreseeable future, that require hard coding to meet performance objectives, when performance is measured by actual business-decision results (accuracy). 

Furthermore, as many of our friends point out, if you truely want the fastest, lowest latency possible, you need to be as close to the “metal” as possible, so C and C++ will always be faster than Java byte code running in a sandbox written in C or C++.   

And, as you (Opher) correctly point out, along with most of the end users we talk to, they do not process megaevents per second on a single platform, so this is a marketing red herring.  This brings us back to our discussions on the future of distributed object caching, grid computing and virtualization – so I’ll stop and go out for some fried rice and shrimp, and some cold Singha beer.