The Predictive Battlespace

June 11, 2008

Friend and colleague Don Adams, CTO World Wide Public Sector, TIBCO Software, explains how CEP can be used to sense, adapt and respond to complex situations in The “Predictive” Battlespace: Leveraging the Power of Event-Driven Architecture in Defense

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Is CEP a Service or a Process? Reloaded

May 30, 2008

In Is CEP a Service or a Process? Paul Vincent of TIBCO blogs that any classification of CEP depends on the application, concluding that CEP is both a process and a service. 

Well (sorry Paul!), I disagree.  CEP is neither a process nor a service; CEP is a concept architecture for processing complex events.   (I have advocated a CEP functional reference architecture, as most readers know.)

To illustrated this point, let’s take a quick look at another functional reference architecture (or, if you perfer, a conceptual architecture), distributed computing.

Is distributed computing a service or a process?

Of course, it is neither a process nor a service, distributed computing is a generic architectural pattern (or style) for processing distributed data, generally across a network.

The same question can be asked of SOA. 

Is SOA a process or a service?

Again, the answer is almost identical. 

SOA is an architectural style (subclass) of distributed computing.

Now, is CEP a product or a service?

CEP is an architectural style (or pattern) for processing complex events.

CEP is neither a process nor a service. 

On the other hand, there are component of a CEP solution that can be represented as a stand alone process or a service.   The same can be said of EAI, SOA, and other subclasses of distributed computing architectural styles and patterns.


Scheduling Agents with Rules Engines

April 5, 2008

Paul Vincent of TIBCO talks about agents in his post, CEP and Agents…

At the core, TIBCO’s BusinessEvents is RETE-based rules engine and rules engines are well suited for scheduling problems.  This makes perfect sense, since many of TIBCO’s customers deploy BusinessEvents in scheduling-oriented, not detection-oriented, solutions.

It begs to be pointed out, however, that scheduling is only one component of a CEP architecture. 

Normally, the scheduling component of a distributed event processing architecture manages the intelligent scheduling of the sharing of data between distributed agents that are running a variety of analytics.

Simply stated, all agents are not rules engines; however, rules engines are often used to schedule the cooperation between analytical agents in a distributed agent-based architecture.


Event-Driven Business Process Management and the Example of the Deutsche Post AG

March 8, 2008

Christoph Emmersberger and Florian Springer have finished their thesis which was written onsite at Oracle Headquarters in Redwood Shores, CA, USA (Note: the link to this paper is not working now):

Event-Driven Business Process Management taking the Example of Deutsche Post AG:  An evaluation of the Approach of Oracle and the SOPERA Open Source SOA Framework

The topic of this thesis was the prototypical integration of the Oracle products

  • ·Oracle BPEL (Business Process Management),
  • ·Oracle BAM (Business Activity Monitoring), and
  • ·Oracle CEP (Complex Event Processing),

within the SOPERA system environment, with the focus on CEP.

For evaluating the capabilities of the components, a business process regarding to shipment, investigation and claim was modelled and implemented.

Different approaches were discussed, evaluated and implemented as prototypes.

The focus of the implementation was to use events for the purpose of monitoring a business process.


Please Welcome Dr. Rainer von Ammon to The CEP Blog

February 12, 2008

Today is an especially joyful occasion on The CEP Blog.    I am pleased to announce that one of the world’s top experts on CEP, Dr. Rainer von Ammon, has joined the blog.

Dr. Rainer von Ammon is managing director of the Centrum für Informations-Technology Transfer (CITT) in Regensburg. Until October 2005 he was Professor for Software Engineering, specializing in E-Business infrastructures and distributed systems, at the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria. Rainer is still teaching there and at the University of Applied Sciences of Regensburg. From 1998 to 2002, he worked as Principal Consultant and Manager for R+D Cooperations at BEA Systems (Central and Eastern Europe). Prior to this, he was Professor for Software Engineering in Dresden with a focus on development of applications with event driven object oriented user interfaces and component based application development. Before this Rainer was acting as manager of the field Basic Systems at the Mummert + Partner Unternehmensberatung, Hamburg. After finishing his studies of Information Sciences at the University of Regensburg, he started as project leader of Computer Based Office Systems (COBIS) from 1978 to 1983 and afterward founded a start up company with some of his colleagues.

Some of you may recall my recent musings, A Bitter Pill To Swallow: First Generation CEP Software Needs To Evolve.   When you read Rainer’s excellent reply, you will quickly see why we are very pleased to have his thought leadership here at The CEP Blog.  Dr. von Ammon and his team are leading experts in CEP and related business integration domains.  Not only does he provide thought leadership, his team  researches, develops, implements and tests CEP solutions.   

In another example of  his thought leadership, some of you might recall this post, Brandl and Guschakowski Deliver Excellent CEP/BAM Report, where Hans-Martin Brandl and David Guschakowski of the University of Applied Sciences Regensburg, Faculty of Information Technology/Mathematics, advised by Dr. von Ammon, completed an excellent CEP thesis, Complex Event Processing in the context of Business Activity Monitoring

Please join me in extending a warm welcome for Dr. Rainer von Ammon to The CEP Blog.


Aite Group Finds Huge Gains for CEP

February 6, 2008

A report by the Aite Group, Capital Markets Firms to Spend $41.8 Billion on IT in 2008,  finds that twice as many IT executives are planning to spend money on SOA compared to CEP.

“46% of respondents plan to implement a SOA this year.  [and ….] 23% anticipate adopting a complex event processing solution […]. “

Considering the many years of hype about SOA, this is a stunning gain for CEP.

SOA has been around for many years, so long in fact, folks often refer to SOA as “Same Old Architecture”.    Therefore, given the fact that the market for CEP is only just now starting to come into play, it is quite impressive that an emerging technology such as CEP is now in the funding radar at levels that are only half of the planned SOA implementations.

The Aite Group writes that “in spite of CEP vendor hype, only 23% anticipate adopting a complex event processing solution this year”; but what Aite failed to say was that in spite of years and years of SOA hype, and countless millions of dollars of SOA marketing, SOA only commands twice the buzz in new project implements.

This is really tremendous news for CEP.


IBM Says Business Event Processing is Not CEP

January 24, 2008

Sandy Carter, IBM’s vice president of SOA and WebSphere strategies, said something in IBM Buys AptSoft To Boost BPM-SOA Line I completely agree with, relative to most of the technologies folks are calling “CEP” these days:

“In the marketplace today, everybody talks about complex event processing,” Carter said. “We actually are trying to rename that category, because we believe the real value is in business event processing, with a focus on the business.”

For example, none of the current CEP vendors are doing “complex event processing” as many of us have said, repeatedly.

TIBCO and AptSoft, for example, are examples of companies that are really implementing, business event processing. You can easily confirm this in TIBCO’s press release, TIBCO BusinessEvents 2.2 now shipping…, where Paul Vincent blogs:

The main change with this [TIBCO BusinessEvents 2.2] release is the inclusion of new deployment options:

+ deploy BusinessEvents within a BusinessWorks container: great for using BusinessEvents as a decision engine for SOA integration processes, choreography, transaction flow monitoring, etc, or for using BusinessWorks as a ruleflow tool.

+ deploy BusinessEvents as a BusinessWorks container: great for exploiting SOA orchestration and services under the control of CEP, such as invoking complex adapters.

This is absolutely, “business event processing” just as IBM’s Sandy Carter stated, correctly in my opinion, not CEP.

The same is true for event stream processing (ESP). ESP technology from companies like Apama, Coral8 and StreamBase, is much more closely aligned with the “business event processing” than anything that is truly CEP.